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Welcome from the Kansas African American Affairs Commission

The Kansas African American Affairs Commission is committed to being catalyst for positive change in African American communities across the State of Kansas.  KAAAC Commissioners and staff have worked to create an informative, accessible, and resourceful website for your use. We encourage you to stay abreast of upcoming programs and community events, as well as, access resources needed to join with the KAAAC in reducing disparities and inequities for African Americans throughout our state. Through community outreach and public policies we create focus on strategies in the areas of Economic Opportunity and Asset Building; Healthy and Safe Communities; Schools and Educational Opportunities; Criminalization and Social Justice; and Civic Leadership and Advocacy.  We look forward to building collaborative relationships with other state agencies; our Legislative Body; Corporations; foundations, small businesses; Faith Based organizations, and community members which will lead to effective changes in African American communities in Kansas. 

If you would like to join our efforts, we encourage you to contact our office, sign up for our Listserv, and/or follow us on Facebook.  It is our hope that together we can successfully construct solutions that will make the State of Kansas a great place for African Americans to reside and prosper.

Our Mission

The KAAAC members work to devise strategies to address public policy concerns of the African American community. The Commission will serve as a conduit for programs, grants, research, and policy advice for state and local organizations while addressing needs for change that are unique to the African American Community in the state of Kansas.


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Latest News & Announcements

Why is the census important?

by Bart Sprague | May 01, 2019
The decennial census is the most inclusive civic activity in our country, covering every person in every household. The U.S. Constitution requires an accurate count of the nation’s population every 10 years.

Moreover, the census is integral to our democracy. The data collected affect our nation’s ability to ensure equal representation and equal access to important governmental and private sector resources for all Americans, including across racial and ethnic lines. Census results are used to allocate seats and draw district lines for the U.S. House of Representatives, state legislatures, and local boards; to target at least $800 billion annually in federal assistance to states, localities, and families; and to guide community decision-making affecting schools, housing, health care services, business investment, and much more. These functions depend on a fair and accurate census.

Unfortunately, certain population groups – referred to as “hard-to-count” – are at a higher risk of not being fully counted in the census. Some of these groups have been historically underrepresented in the census for decades; some may experience new or increased vulnerability due to major changes in methodology, such as relying on the internet as the primary way for households to respond to the 2020 Census; and some may be reluctant to respond due to concerns about data confidentiality. Being hard-to-count can lead to unequal political representation and unequal access to vital public and private resources for these groups and their communities.

African-American households are at risk of being undercounted. The African-American population has been historically undercounted in the decennial census, disadvantaging their families, communities, and neighborhoods.

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